Category: Greywolfe’s Lair

Scandroid Review: It’s Not The Past, Exactly, But It Sounds Like The Future.

Ah, Klayton.

An image of Klayton, front man of the band Scandroid.
Klayton, a ridiculously prolific artist

A man of many styles that still manages to enthrall and inspire even to this day, twenty years after his Circle of Dust debut. In his various guises, he has penned industrial music, more melodic songs, slightly more metal sounds and then some.

For this album, he travels to his roots. To that time in the eighties when New Wave ruled supreme and no one could see anything but synthesizers for miles around. Read more

Flaunt It Review: Fake That Boogie, Dance On, Dance On!

The 1980’s.

No other decade since the 50’s had been so steeped in Futurism.

In the 50’s, that nod toward futurism was all about flying cars and robots.  Things that would make life easier.  In the fifties, too, this futurism was all about cleanliness.  The future portrayed in the fifties generally had a lot of clean, sleek lines.  From the Hanna-Barbera domes the Jetsons lived in to the vast robots that occupied more space than a mere human, the future seemed to be bright and generally on the side of the people.

Then, the American Dream was shattered and the nightmare we woke up in was a little bit different.  A little bit darker.

But not everything about 80’s futurism was entirely dark.  Sure, there were much harsher lines, now.  And a much darker tone in terms of corporations ruling everything and yes, there was a lot of fear that the arms race between America and Russia would turn game-ending for everyone, but where the 80’s were grittier, they still had a lot of colour and spark.

And this is about where I introduce Sigue Sigue Sputnik. Read more

Greywolfe’s 4 in February.

Welcome, one and all to a new year and a new February. Last year, I didn't do very well at all, so this year, I'm going to try my utmost to actually vanquish four games off of my tottering pile of games that I've collected over the last forty+ years. Read more

It was the WRUP before Christmas

And I was still playing Saint's Row 3.

And I have grown to seriously not like the hostage diversion.

I'd been messing around with stealing cars, because you have to do that to get through the big list of stuff that entails a "perfect game."  and along the way, i'd taken twenty hostages.  these were all mostly innocent bystanders.  i just wanted the cars, you see, so i could rack up the requisite number [150] for the achievement.

But then I had to sit down and actually slog through getting hostages.

And that's super tedious.  Allow me to explain:

To take a car, you go up to the car and you hit a button.  Not a problem.  If there's a bonus person in the car, you can take them as a hostage.  But not everyone's on board with being a hostage, so while the car is being stolen, they will typically tumble out before the hostage notification can be posted.  OK.  Fine.  There's a faster way of stealing a car where you can run along the tarmac and "jump" into the car from a distance.  Only this will SOMETIMES eject everyone else out the car.  Did it have two people in it [a driver and a potential hostage?]  Well, great, now they're on the floor spazzing out.

The game also randomizes cars and how many people are in them.  See a car that - one time - had a driver and two hostages?  The next time, it might only have a driver.

It's tedious.  And you have to get 50 [!] of these.  No wonder I've been leaving these for last [well, these and the backbreakingly stupid Heli-Assault missions.]

So.  Gentle Reader.  In the pursuit of a "perfect game" what achievements and/or actions have you had to perform that you ended up disliking?

And with that, let's find out what the rest of the Twinstiq crew are playing: Read more

Loom Review: Unfinished Symphony

Sometimes, a game comes along that does something extra-ordinary.

Before you play it, you can't help but wonder if you're going to like it - exactly because of it's differences - but once you have played it, you see the world just a little bit differently.  The game opens new possibilities, new vistas.

Loom's story isn't wholly original, but given it's run time and the themes it's trying to convey to the player, that's just fine.  What is masterful is the way it presents this story. Read more

Twinstiq Gameclub Plays: Beneath A Steel Sky

Welcome, everyone to another edition of game club.  Game club is not at all like Fight Club.  We absolutely encourage you to talk about it.

As ever, we go in rounds and for this particular round, I’ve picked the stellar adventure game Beneath A Steel Sky.

Read on past the break to find out how this is going to work and what you need to do to get the game. Read more

To The Moon Review: Memories Of The Way We Were

Last week, we talked a little about Brothers and games very like it.  These titles are often experiences more than they are games.  You get into them and you direct a protagonist, but you don’t do much actual video gaming:  there’s no one to kill, there’s no score to beat and – most tellingly, often, no way to really fail.

There’s just you, the story and whatever medium the story passes through as it unfolds.  Sometimes, this is a walking simulator, [you are in a 3d environment where you can roam around and encounter the story] sometimes, it’s a text-driven experience where the narrative unfolds as a collection of still pictures and verbose writing, but sometimes – as is the case with To The Moon – the entire affair is top-down and looks remarkably like an old-school 16 bit RPG.

At first, that sounds like a supremely odd thing to do, but it works here.  It works because a lot of the story is conveyed by dialogue and RPG’s can sometimes by very dialogue heavy. Read more

Brothers: A Tale Of Two Sons Review: You Put Your Left Stick In

Gaming is largely made up of two big landmasses.

On the one hand, we have games that are truly games – with systems and high scores and scores of people to kill.

On the other, there are experiences.  The industry hasn’t been kind to these, calling them walking simulators and then writing them off, but these experiences are part of the glue-that-binds.  You see, there are just things that cannot be done in a book or movie form.  You can only have them as games.

Brothers is a game like this.  It straddles a quite-fine line between experience/walking simulator and “game” but it thrives exactly because it’s on that knife edge.

And, in one short play through, it has become one of my very favourite games of 2016. Read more