Tag Archives: Nintendo

Game Changers: GoldenEye 007

GoldenEye 007 (Nintendo 64) (Rare, 1997) Game Changers is a semi-regular column featuring games which have had a significant impact on me over the years. Games that were so incredibly stunning and awe-inspiring, they changed my conception of what a game could be at the time. Previously, I have written about Out Run, Street Fighter…
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Why I Can’t Take E3 [Or Any Trade Convention] Seriously

It happens every year.  Every year, without fail, at around this time, "real" news [and I use the word in inverted commas, because really - game releases and hints at game releases aren't really "news" at all.  They're - at best - terrible product placement] drops right off the radar. Why?  Because some PR drone…
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Greywolfe’s Games To Look Forward To In 2016.

Please note:  This article is LITTERED with links.  They will open in a new window and will take you off-site. Now that four-in-February is behind us, I thought I'd take some time to look into games that I'm at least a little curious about for the calendar year of 2016. I have divided my choices…
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The Twinstiq Podcast – Ep. 25: #4iF

The Twinstiq Podcast is back with a promise: It includes audio! Granted, not the best of promises, but we have a 100% satisfaction or else money back guarantee when it comes to the inclusion of audio. Tell us of another podcast that does that! Topics this week: #4iF, one year without Joystiq, one year with…
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Banjo-Kazooie Review: It’s In The Nuts And Bolts

My comfort zone when it comes to video games extends to slow games. I like adventure games. I like turn based strategy games [assuming there aren't a billion units]. I like turn based role playing games [assuming there isn't a stupid ton of micromanagement]. So, platformers are generally right out. The speed of a platformer,…
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Some new Nintendo news from the wankers over at the Wall Street Journal

We got some new information on the Nintendo NX. According to the fucking (Pay-)Wall(ed) Street Journal, development kits for Nintendo’s announced but not really console or whatever have been distributed to select third-party developers. The NX will “likely include both a console and at least one mobile unit that could either be used in conjunction…
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Opinion: Embrace Emulation

Computer games have a pretty short history when you compare them with other media - books, movies and music all have far, far more works attributed to them than video games could ever have - and yet those media [books, movies and music] don't have nearly the same technological hill to climb as video games.…
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Opinion: He’s Just Not My [Body] Type

AAA gaming seems to be in a rut of making perfect protagonists. That is: body perfect men in their prime who can shoot guns and wield swords and do all kinds of crazy stuff. Most of these men don't have an inkling of self-doubt. Once they set themselves on a course, they follow through with…
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Opinion: The Mystery Of Music

Long, long ago. Back when computers were new and gaming was just a twinkle in Nintendo's eye, the music that computers actually made was...well, atrocious. It sort of depended on which computer you had, of course, but the IBM PC - my gaming platform of choice - largely went silent in those years, because it was a pretty binary choice. You either enjoyed the sounds of silence or you had to contend with the PC speaker. And oh God. You did not want to contend with the PC speaker. Capable of only outputting one tone - a high pitched bleep - composers would try to wrangle the PC speaker into making music that would make you grit your teeth. Some folks managed semi-interesting sounds: The opening of Xenon 2, Megablast, wasn't terrible on the PC speaker. The same is arguably true of Maniac Mansion, but by and large, most people's reaction to PC speaker music was "TURN IT OFF." So, when sound cards came along, I bought one immediately. And it changed my entire perspective on gaming.

And Sierra Said "Let There Be Music" And Lo, For There Was

The first few sound cards for computers were ridiculously expensive until the Adlib came along. The Adlib didn't sound great, but in comparison with the PC Speaker, well, it was /fantastic./

Ah, the Adlib. FM-Synthesis at it's cheapest.

The first few companies to seriously embrace music on the PC did so at great cost: the only sort of electronic machinery capable of playing the sounds that the original developers wanted to hear were expensive, costing easily into the $500 realm. This, of course, simply wouldn't do. So Sierra helped usher in the era of the cheap FM-Synthesis card in the form of the Adlib. And from there, things took off at a swift pace. Cryo, masters of beautiful, somewhat confusing games, threw their hat in the ring. The Dune soundtrack is - to this day - a marvel of FM Synthesis. However did their composer get that card to make those noises? No one but he [and some professionals who know that hardware very well] knew what he did, but it was magic. It was the first game sound track I fell in love with and it opened my ears to a world I'd - quite frankly - formerly ignored.

But There Were Many Machines And They All Sounded Different

If you switched on a computer or a console during the mid-eighties or the early 90's, you had no real way of knowing what you were in store for music wise. It was quite an interesting time for video game sound.

The Amiga 1000, the NES and the SNES - each sounded very different.

While I'm talking - most specifically - about the IBM PC, because that's what I got to know the best, there were a bunch of other machines out there - and they all sounded a little different, because they all used very different music chips. The Amiga, for example, used the Paula sound chip to great effect, allowing composers to use samples as part of their songs. A game that perfectly showcased this ability and that made a lasting impression on anyone into gaming music was Shadow Of The Beast 2. But then, too, there were the consoles. And each console was created differently - because nobody could settle on standards at that particular time and place - and we were grateful of it, because it allowed us to hear so many different soundscapes. On the NES, for example, there was the awesome, proto-rock of Contra. You couldn't help but bob your head along to the music of the first stage. And while it wasn't quite the same as the sounds coming out of an arcade, it was of a vintage all it's own. Something you soaked up and listened to long after the game was over. As time marched onward and music chips got better and better, so too did the sounds. The 8 bit frontier gave way to the 16 bit land of Utopia and with it came a new plethora of sounds and songs that could get pretty dense if listened to in the right atmosphere. I remember the very first time I heard the slow, pulsating electronica of Stickerbrush Symphony and being absolutely blown away by how complex that piece of music was - how many different layers of sound were bubbling just underneath the surface of such a simple song.

The Most Important Thing: Every Machine's Sound Was Unique

To The Moon had emotional, beautiful music with some haunting lyrics. Shovel Knight just sounded like a lost NES classic from the word go.

To The Moon and Shovel Knight, both aural classics in their own way.

One thing that - I think, anyway - is missing from modern computing and modern gaming is how different each of these sound chips were - what they could do, how they would sound, which musical genuis would learn the ins and outs of this specific hardware. A lot of that mystery has fallen by the wayside as we reached the pinnacle of sound in the form of CD-Quality music. Sure, you can get a symphony to record your soundtrack now, but the problem with that - for me - is that anyone can do that. There's no real mystery in what I'm hearing anymore. No interesting finessing of the hardware to produce something radical and interesting. On the other hand, this has given me some of my favourite more modern soundtracks. While there are only a handful of real "songs" in To The Moon, each song [with vocals - something that was difficult to achieve in that long-ago time of near-silence] is special in it's own particular and beautiful way. And - to be fair - modern composers might find the soundscapes of the NES somewhat stifling - having to only work within very particular constraints to produce very particular tones means that there are limits to what you can do. While - for example - the soundtrack of Shovel Knight was amazing, I imagine that the composers for that game might have been genuinely taken aback at first with what they could and couldn't do, given their desire to slavishly emulate the NES. So, you win some and you lose some. But I am just grateful - in the very long run - that we moved away from the sound of silence. The mystery of music is far better.
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New Nintendo eShop Releases: Mario Golf (64)

Mario Golf (64) is now available for the Wii U Nintendo 64 Virtual Console! The first of the "modern" three-dimensional Mario Golf games, Mario Golf was also released over 12 years after the previous, NES entry (Nintendo never made a Mario Golf game for the Super Nintendo). Also out this week, the never-before-released outside of Japan, 2-player,…
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