Author: greywolfe

Greywolfe is a curmudgeon who likes old games, long walks on the beach and also bear form in World of Warcraft. He sends his regards from the Lonely Island where he does nothing but play King's Quest and write opinion pieces all day.

Twinstiq Game Club Plays: Primordia

Welcome to the city of glass and light!  That’ll be five megacycles, thanks.

And now that you’re here, why don’t you join us in playing Primordia, which – co-incidentally – takes place IN the city of glass and light – Metropol set in a time where there are no more humans because of some unspecified calamity that took place in the far distant past.

Instead of humans, we have sentient builder robots who believe – through the legacy of the Gospel of Man that they should take care of the Earth.

So, let’s talk about what you need to do if you’d like to join us. Read more

It was the WRUP before Christmas

And I was still playing Saint's Row 3.

And I have grown to seriously not like the hostage diversion.

I'd been messing around with stealing cars, because you have to do that to get through the big list of stuff that entails a "perfect game."  and along the way, i'd taken twenty hostages.  these were all mostly innocent bystanders.  i just wanted the cars, you see, so i could rack up the requisite number [150] for the achievement.

But then I had to sit down and actually slog through getting hostages.

And that's super tedious.  Allow me to explain:

To take a car, you go up to the car and you hit a button.  Not a problem.  If there's a bonus person in the car, you can take them as a hostage.  But not everyone's on board with being a hostage, so while the car is being stolen, they will typically tumble out before the hostage notification can be posted.  OK.  Fine.  There's a faster way of stealing a car where you can run along the tarmac and "jump" into the car from a distance.  Only this will SOMETIMES eject everyone else out the car.  Did it have two people in it [a driver and a potential hostage?]  Well, great, now they're on the floor spazzing out.

The game also randomizes cars and how many people are in them.  See a car that - one time - had a driver and two hostages?  The next time, it might only have a driver.

It's tedious.  And you have to get 50 [!] of these.  No wonder I've been leaving these for last [well, these and the backbreakingly stupid Heli-Assault missions.]

So.  Gentle Reader.  In the pursuit of a "perfect game" what achievements and/or actions have you had to perform that you ended up disliking?

And with that, let's find out what the rest of the Twinstiq crew are playing: Read more

WRUP …of the gods.

I have slowly but surely been grinding away at a "perfect game" of Saints Row 3 [minus stealing and loading all the cars into my garage, because even that seems a bit overboard for me.]

As of about three hours ago, I became an invincible god [more-or-less - I still somehow got killed on a watercraft because I was trying to blow up other watercraft.  I have no idea how that works?!] - and it's made the game more-or-less what it should have been from the start:  a busted, fantasy simulation of power.  It has mostly trivialized the game, of course, but eh.  I'm having fun ;)

How about you guys?  Do you prefer the challenge of games like this prior to becoming a walking god?  Or do you prefer the ridiculous broken-ness of being a post-game/maxed out character.

Anyhow, now that we know I'm playing Saint's Row 3, let's check into what everyone else on the Twinstiq Team is doing:

Read more

Loom Review: Unfinished Symphony

Sometimes, a game comes along that does something extra-ordinary.

Before you play it, you can't help but wonder if you're going to like it - exactly because of it's differences - but once you have played it, you see the world just a little bit differently.  The game opens new possibilities, new vistas.

Loom's story isn't wholly original, but given it's run time and the themes it's trying to convey to the player, that's just fine.  What is masterful is the way it presents this story. Read more

WRUP: Isolation.

I'm not playing Alien:  Isolation because a bunch of other Twinstiq folks are and I'm not very into horror games at all, I'm afraid.  Plus.  Halloween has come and gone.

So, let's talk about games OTHER than Alien:  Isolation that the Twinstiq crew are playing: Read more

Twinstiq Gameclub Plays: Beneath A Steel Sky

Welcome, everyone to another edition of game club.  Game club is not at all like Fight Club.  We absolutely encourage you to talk about it.

As ever, we go in rounds and for this particular round, I’ve picked the stellar adventure game Beneath A Steel Sky.

Read on past the break to find out how this is going to work and what you need to do to get the game. Read more

To The Moon Review: Memories Of The Way We Were

Last week, we talked a little about Brothers and games very like it.  These titles are often experiences more than they are games.  You get into them and you direct a protagonist, but you don’t do much actual video gaming:  there’s no one to kill, there’s no score to beat and – most tellingly, often, no way to really fail.

There’s just you, the story and whatever medium the story passes through as it unfolds.  Sometimes, this is a walking simulator, [you are in a 3d environment where you can roam around and encounter the story] sometimes, it’s a text-driven experience where the narrative unfolds as a collection of still pictures and verbose writing, but sometimes – as is the case with To The Moon – the entire affair is top-down and looks remarkably like an old-school 16 bit RPG.

At first, that sounds like a supremely odd thing to do, but it works here.  It works because a lot of the story is conveyed by dialogue and RPG’s can sometimes by very dialogue heavy. Read more

Brothers: A Tale Of Two Sons Review: You Put Your Left Stick In

Gaming is largely made up of two big landmasses.

On the one hand, we have games that are truly games – with systems and high scores and scores of people to kill.

On the other, there are experiences.  The industry hasn’t been kind to these, calling them walking simulators and then writing them off, but these experiences are part of the glue-that-binds.  You see, there are just things that cannot be done in a book or movie form.  You can only have them as games.

Brothers is a game like this.  It straddles a quite-fine line between experience/walking simulator and “game” but it thrives exactly because it’s on that knife edge.

And, in one short play through, it has become one of my very favourite games of 2016. Read more